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  • Nancy Faust story for ESPN

    https://www.espn.com/mlb/story/_/id/...-tone-baseball
    Terrific read if you loved Nancy (and who didn't?).

  • #2
    You're right, great read and I loved Nancy.
    Batting in the second position for the White Sox, number 2, the second baseman Nelson Fox.

    Comment


    • #3
      I was at Comiskey for a Sunday double header against the Royals some time in the early 1970s, and I think that double header is remembered as somewhat significant in the Sox history of the era. The Sox were chasing the Royals and they won the first game, on a home run by Bill Melton, if I recall correctly. The park was full and at the end of the first game the place was rocking, as loud as I have ever seen -- possibly except for the Sox-Dodgers game in early 2005 that featured the famous AJ bat flip. The Royals came back and won the second game, and the Sox never recovered that year. I have hated the Royals ever since. Some time later I read somewhere that that was the day Nancy Faust first used "Na Na Hey Hey, Kiss Him Goodbye", in the first game. I have no recollection of that, but I would like to think I was there for that momentous event.

      Anybody else remember that double header, and/or can verify the birth of "Na Na Na Na, Goodbye" at Sox games?

      It is difficult to overestimate how important Nancy Faust has been for so long in the heart and soul of the Sox.
      Last edited by FourGoldGloves; 08-31-2020, 08:14 AM.

      Four Sox Gold Gloves in 1960.
      One position player Gold Glove in the last 21 years.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by FourGoldGloves View Post
        I was at Comiskey for a Sunday double header against the Royals some time in the early 1970s, and I think that double header is remembered as somewhat significant in the Sox history of the era. The Sox were chasing the Royals and they won the first game, on a home run by Bill Melton, if I recall correctly. The park was full and at the end of the first game the place was rocking, as loud as I have ever seen -- possibly except for the Sox-Dodgers game in early 2005 that featured the famous AJ bat flip. The Royals came back and won the second game, and the Sox never recovered that year. I have hated the Royals ever since. Some time later I read somewhere that that was the day Nancy Faust first used "Na Na Hey Hey, Kiss Him Goodbye", in the first game. I have no recollection of that, but I would like to think I was there for that momentous event.

        Anybody else remember that double header, and/or can verify the birth of "Na Na Na Na, Goodbye" at Sox games?

        It is difficult to overestimate how important Nancy Faust has been for so long in heart and soul of the Sox.
        July 31, 1977 -- it was great to be alive and I'm jealous you were there! Here's the box score of that first game. I wasn't there, but watched it on TV while I was at work in an electronics shop that had TVs on the shelf. The Sox won three out of four from the haughty Royals, who made no secret of their distaste for what they regarded as the bush behavior of the Sox and of the rockin' ballpark. The Royals won the second game, and you're right that the Sox never recovered. It was the beginning of the end of that glorious summer-long party.

        Nancy had been using "Kiss Him Goodbye" for some time in situations when an opposing pitcher was taken out. But for some metaphysical reason we can't explain, everybody started singing along that season. I don't know if that particular weekend was when that song took flight as a White Sox anthem, but there's no doubt it was the right song at the right time.

        Nancy's catalog of brilliant musical one-liners is huge. A few off the top of my head:
        • "The Heat Is On" during a Sox rally;
        • "What Kind of Fool Am I?" when some joker ran on the field;
        • "Reunited" at Eric Soderholm's first at-bat with the Rangers after he'd been traded;
        • At the first throwback game in 1990 when the Sox re-created the 1910 experience with no public-address system, a manual scoreboard, and the players in vintage uniforms, Nancy walked through the park playing an accordion instead of the organ;
        • During player introductions when she had a riff for each player, she played this old Boushelle commercial theme when Daniel Hudson was announced warming up in the bullpen. I might have been only one a dozen people in the park who recognized that, and I laughed out loud.
        She's also a lovely person besides being a gifted keyboard comic. Always gracious with visitors, she hung around autographing programs for a line that extended down the first-base concourse at the end of her final game in 2010.

        I977 was a year all the stars aligned and everybody left the building with a backslapping laugh. Nancy was the chorus director and we were happy to sing along.
        - tebman

        Comment


        • #5
          I was at that doubleheader. Sat near the Sox Supporters section in left. Think they had a sheet parade between the two games. Was a big party and was cool getting served beer without an ID at 16 years old. Good memories.

          Comment


          • #6
            Nancy’s Twitter handle is @played41. She is worth a follow.
            “It's not the high price of stardom that bothers me...it's the high price of mediocrity." - Bill Veeck

            "If I was going to storm a pillbox, going to sheer, utter, certain death, and the Colonel said 'Shepherd, pick six guys", I'd pick six White Sox fans because they have known death every day of their lives and it holds no terror for them." - Jean Shepherd

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by tebman View Post

              July 31, 1977 -- it was great to be alive and I'm jealous you were there! Here's the box score of that first game. I wasn't there, but watched it on TV while I was at work in an electronics shop that had TVs on the shelf. The Sox won three out of four from the haughty Royals, who made no secret of their distaste for what they regarded as the bush behavior of the Sox and of the rockin' ballpark. The Royals won the second game, and you're right that the Sox never recovered. It was the beginning of the end of that glorious summer-long party.

              Nancy had been using "Kiss Him Goodbye" for some time in situations when an opposing pitcher was taken out. But for some metaphysical reason we can't explain, everybody started singing along that season. I don't know if that particular weekend was when that song took flight as a White Sox anthem, but there's no doubt it was the right song at the right time.

              Nancy's catalog of brilliant musical one-liners is huge. A few off the top of my head:
              • "The Heat Is On" during a Sox rally;
              • "What Kind of Fool Am I?" when some joker ran on the field;
              • "Reunited" at Eric Soderholm's first at-bat with the Rangers after he'd been traded;
              • At the first throwback game in 1990 when the Sox re-created the 1910 experience with no public-address system, a manual scoreboard, and the players in vintage uniforms, Nancy walked through the park playing an accordion instead of the organ;
              • During player introductions when she had a riff for each player, she played this old Boushelle commercial theme when Daniel Hudson was announced warming up in the bullpen. I might have been only one a dozen people in the park who recognized that, and I laughed out loud.
              She's also a lovely person besides being a gifted keyboard comic. Always gracious with visitors, she hung around autographing programs for a line that extended down the first-base concourse at the end of her final game in 2010.

              I977 was a year all the stars aligned and everybody left the building with a backslapping laugh. Nancy was the chorus director and we were happy to sing along.
              Originally posted by Jfinsocal View Post
              I was at that doubleheader. Sat near the Sox Supporters section in left. Think they had a sheet parade between the two games. Was a big party and was cool getting served beer without an ID at 16 years old. Good memories.
              You folks are amazing. Thanks tebman for the link to the box score. I obviously got the winning home run wrong. It was Chet Lemon who tied it in the 10th with a 2-run HR and Eric Soderholm (source of my confusion with Melton?) scored the winning run on a single by Ralph Garr.

              I was surprised to see that the starting pitcher in the first game was none other than Steve Stone. He pitched 9 2/3 innings but gave up two runs in the 10th, necessitating the 3-run comeback. I wonder if Stone has talked about that game on the air and that is why my memory seems so vivid. But I was definitely there, sitting on the first base side halfway between home plate and the right field foul pole. One memory that can't have been influenced by Stone is my vivid image of the Royals' right fielder Al Cowens, and "haughty" is exactly the way I would describe the "why-am-I-wasting-my-time-playing-these-slugs" look on his face. Maybe my reaction was triggered by the blue hat -- or by Cowens' 3 hits in game 1.
              Last edited by FourGoldGloves; 08-31-2020, 11:05 AM.

              Four Sox Gold Gloves in 1960.
              One position player Gold Glove in the last 21 years.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by FourGoldGloves View Post

                old

                You folks are amazing. Thanks tebman for the link to the box score. I obviously got the winning home run wrong. It was Chet Lemon who tied it in the 10th with a 2-run HR and Eric Soderholm (source of my confusion with Melton?) scored the winning run on a single by Ralph Garr.

                I was surprised to see that the starting pitcher in the first game was none other than Steve Stone. He pitched 9 2/3 innings but gave up two runs in the 10th, necessitating the 3-run comeback. I wonder if Stone has talked about that game on the air and that is why my memory seems so vivid. But I was definitely there, sitting on the first base side halfway between home plate and the right field foul pole. One memory that can't have been influenced by Stone is my vivid image of the Royals' right fielder Al Cowens, and "haughty" is exactly the way I would describe the "why-am-I-wasting-my-time-playing-these-slugs" look on his face. Maybe my reaction was triggered by the blue hat -- or by Cowens' 3 hits in game 1.
                I was there also sitting in the lower left field grandstand, after the the comeback win in game one. Comiskey Park was shaking to the rafters like never before. The fans were delirious with joy dancing in the aisles with screaming and yelling everywhere. I've been to hundreds of Blackhawk games at the old Chicago Stadium and there was no place on earth louder than that except for July 31, 1977 at old Comiskey.
                I've often thought what would have happened if the Sox had won game 2 thinking that the Royals would have been so demoralized that they might have folded. As we know that scenario didn't happen and one week later everything changed.
                The Sox fell apart and looking back the team was short on pitching and defense but those first 4 months were something to behold for us Sox fans, something out of a great play and movie, "let it not be forgot that there once was a spot for one brief shining moment that was known as Camelot".
                Batting in the second position for the White Sox, number 2, the second baseman Nelson Fox.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by tebman View Post

                  July 31, 1977 -- it was great to be alive and I'm jealous you were there! Here's the box score of that first game. I wasn't there, but watched it on TV while I was at work in an electronics shop that had TVs on the shelf. The Sox won three out of four from the haughty Royals, who made no secret of their distaste for what they regarded as the bush behavior of the Sox and of the rockin' ballpark. The Royals won the second game, and you're right that the Sox never recovered. It was the beginning of the end of that glorious summer-long party.

                  Nancy had been using "Kiss Him Goodbye" for some time in situations when an opposing pitcher was taken out. But for some metaphysical reason we can't explain, everybody started singing along that season. I don't know if that particular weekend was when that song took flight as a White Sox anthem, but there's no doubt it was the right song at the right time.

                  Nancy's catalog of brilliant musical one-liners is huge. A few off the top of my head:
                  • "The Heat Is On" during a Sox rally;
                  • "What Kind of Fool Am I?" when some joker ran on the field;
                  • "Reunited" at Eric Soderholm's first at-bat with the Rangers after he'd been traded;
                  • At the first throwback game in 1990 when the Sox re-created the 1910 experience with no public-address system, a manual scoreboard, and the players in vintage uniforms, Nancy walked through the park playing an accordion instead of the organ;
                  • During player introductions when she had a riff for each player, she played this old Boushelle commercial theme when Daniel Hudson was announced warming up in the bullpen. I might have been only one a dozen people in the park who recognized that, and I laughed out loud.
                  She's also a lovely person besides being a gifted keyboard comic. Always gracious with visitors, she hung around autographing programs for a line that extended down the first-base concourse at the end of her final game in 2010.

                  I977 was a year all the stars aligned and everybody left the building with a backslapping laugh. Nancy was the chorus director and we were happy to sing along.
                  IIRC Na Na started in earnest during the second game of a Sunday DH against the Twins in early July. The Sox hit 3 homers in the game on their way to a 4 game sweep. I have heard there were about 3 or 4 guys who were in their early 20s sitting in the upper deck right below the Press Box and Harry Caray and to the right of Nancy and her organ and they started singing the song and Nancy picked up on it, the rest is history.
                  Last edited by LITTLE NELL; 08-31-2020, 12:36 PM.
                  Batting in the second position for the White Sox, number 2, the second baseman Nelson Fox.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by FourGoldGloves View Post



                    You folks are amazing. Thanks tebman for the link to the box score. I obviously got the winning home run wrong. It was Chet Lemon who tied it in the 10th with a 2-run HR and Eric Soderholm (source of my confusion with Melton?) scored the winning run on a single by Ralph Garr.

                    I was surprised to see that the starting pitcher in the first game was none other than Steve Stone. He pitched 9 2/3 innings but gave up two runs in the 10th, necessitating the 3-run comeback. I wonder if Stone has talked about that game on the air and that is why my memory seems so vivid. But I was definitely there, sitting on the first base side halfway between home plate and the right field foul pole. One memory that can't have been influenced by Stone is my vivid image of the Royals' right fielder Al Cowens, and "haughty" is exactly the way I would describe the "why-am-I-wasting-my-time-playing-these-slugs" look on his face. Maybe my reaction was triggered by the blue hat -- or by Cowens' 3 hits in game 1.
                    Ahh, Al Cowens -- I was at the game, June 20, 1980, when Al Cowens (Tigers' right fielder that year) came to bat against Ed Farmer in the 11th inning. I had organized a busload of folks to that game, and some were getting impatient because it had gone into extra innings. They weren't as keen as I was on spending extra time at the ballpark.

                    Cowens hit a grounder to short. From my seat in the third-base side of the upper deck, I followed the ball as Todd Cruz fielded it. He paused awkwardly before throwing to first, and as I followed the throw I saw Cowens and Farmer rolling on the mound. The dugouts emptied instantly, and nobody, including the players, knew what was going on. Seems that Cowens had been slow-burning for almost two years over being hit in the jaw by a pitch from Farmer when both were on different teams. He snapped that night and jumped Farmer from behind instead of running to first after he hit the grounder.

                    The predictable brawl ensued, which my impatient colleagues found entertaining, but annoyed them further since it made them even later getting home. The Sox actually filed assault charges against Cowens, but Farmer said he wouldn't do that if Cowens apologized. Some weeks later they shook hands publicly in Detroit as lineups were exchanged at the plate. Strange days, indeed.

                    There's a fragmentary video here of what happened that night. I don't remember what Nancy was playing as that was happening, but I'm confident it was appropriate and funny.


                    - tebman

                    Comment

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