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Sox Radio Broadcast Likely Moving to ESPN 1000 Next Season.

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  • Sox Radio Broadcast Likely Moving to ESPN 1000 Next Season.

    https://www.robertfeder.com/2020/08/...ded-espn-1000/

  • #2
    Good. I always thought that frequency was their best one.

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    • #3
      I think that's a bad idea cuz WGN I think can reach the most people, but I don't know how much radio really matters in the 21st century.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by whitesox5187 View Post
        I think that's a bad idea cuz WGN I think can reach the most people, but I don't know how much radio really matters in the 21st century.
        That's what I was thinking. AM 1000 seemed to have a much more limited range in signal whereas as I could pick up WGN for hundreds of miles away from Chicago. But like you said, I don't know if this is really such a big issue anymore as it may have been 15 or 20 years ago. People can access local radio play by play via the MLB app or via SiriusXM these days.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by GoSoxMMV View Post

          That's what I was thinking. AM 1000 seemed to have a much more limited range in signal whereas as I could pick up WGN for hundreds of miles away from Chicago. But like you said, I don't know if this is really such a big issue anymore as it may have been 15 or 20 years ago. People can access local radio play by play via the MLB app or via SiriusXM these days.
          How do find the Sox game on Sirius? I can never find it. Does each team have its own channel?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Dumpjerry View Post

            How do find the Sox game on Sirius? I can never find it. Does each team have its own channel?
            This website provides the channel info. NOTE the drop-down item near the top that lets you choose between "Sirius", "XM", or "SiriusXM". It looks like the channel numbers are different for "Sirius".
            https://www.siriusxm.com/chicagowhitesox


            If you have access to their streaming channels, the Sox radio broadcast feed is always available on Channel 845. In addition to streaming through your phone, tablet, or computer, you can also play this through an Amazon Alexa speaker if you have one in your home.

            If you're trying to tune in through a car satellite radio, SiriusXM only provides the home team broadcast for each game and the channel varies from game to game. For example, the site above shows tonight's broadcast is on Ch. 180 and tomorrow's game is on Ch. 177. The weekend games at Wrigley will only have the Cubs feed via radio as they're the home team, but you can always access the Sox feed via streaming on Ch. 845.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Hitmen77 View Post

              This website provides the channel info. NOTE the drop-down item near the top that lets you choose between "Sirius", "XM", or "SiriusXM". It looks like the channel numbers are different for "Sirius".
              https://www.siriusxm.com/chicagowhitesox


              If you have access to their streaming channels, the Sox radio broadcast feed is always available on Channel 845. In addition to streaming through your phone, tablet, or computer, you can also play this through an Amazon Alexa speaker if you have one in your home.

              If you're trying to tune in through a car satellite radio, SiriusXM only provides the home team broadcast for each game and the channel varies from game to game. For example, the site above shows tonight's broadcast is on Ch. 180 and tomorrow's game is on Ch. 177. The weekend games at Wrigley will only have the Cubs feed via radio as they're the home team, but you can always access the Sox feed via streaming on Ch. 845.
              Thanks.

              I would only need it in the car. My AM reception at the office is fine, but my Score and ESPN 1000 reception in the car (even in wide open areas). WGN's reception is adequate (stronger signal?)

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Dumpjerry View Post
                Thanks.

                I would only need it in the car. My AM reception at the office is fine, but my Score and ESPN 1000 reception in the car (even in wide open areas). WGN's reception is adequate (stronger signal?)
                For a long time WGN's reception was one of the strongest in the U.S. and I think could be heard in 48 states? Or maybe it was just everywhere east of the Rockies. I don't know if that is still the case though.

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                • #9
                  AM 1000 is terrible outside the metro area. Can rarely pull it in here in Madison, Wisconsin. 720 rings clear as a bell.

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                  • #10
                    AM1000 is a 50,00 watt station. This is the maximum power allowed for a commercial station.They send their signal to the east.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Paulwny View Post
                      AM1000 is a 50,000 watt station. This is the maximum power allowed for a commercial station.They send their signal to the east.

                      Both WGN and WMVP (the old WCFL) are 50,000 watt, maximum-power stations. Like Paulwny said, WMVP sends its signal to the east. It's licensed that way because it shares the 1000 kHz frequency with KOMO in Seattle. The coverage map on the left shows the pattern for WGN from its transmitter in Schaumburg, and the image on the right shows WMVP's nighttime signal pattern from its transmitter in Downers Grove. The maps just show the patterns; at night the signals go hundreds of miles farther. WMVP comes in like gangbusters in Ohio and Pennsylvania at night, but is lousy if you're west of Aurora.


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                      In some historical irony, the Sox were on WCFL (AM 1000) through most of the 1940s-1960s, and later for a stretch after it became WMVP. The picture below is from a 1962 parade showing WCFL plugging White Sox games.

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                      - tebman

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Paulwny View Post
                        AM1000 is a 50,00 watt station. This is the maximum power allowed for a commercial station.They send their signal to the east.
                        When I was in the Air Force in from 65-69 I picked up WLS 890 everynight while stationed in South Dakota in 65 and 66. When I was transfered to Newburgh New York in 1967 I picked up WMAQ 670 and listened to a lot of Sox games especially during in September and that great pennant race that year.
                        I had no idea that the stations sent their signals to certain areas, I always thought the signal was sent out 360 degrees. Explains why I could never pick up WLS when I was in New York.
                        IIRC, WLS, WMAQ, WGN and WCFL were all 50,000 watt stations.
                        Last edited by LITTLE NELL; 08-20-2020, 04:01 PM.
                        Batting in the second position for the White Sox, number 2, the second baseman Nelson Fox.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by LITTLE NELL View Post

                          When I was in the Air Force in from 65-69 I picked up WLS 890 everynight while stationed in South Dakota in 65 and 66. When I was transfered to Newburgh New York in 1967 I picked up WMAQ 670 and listened to a lot of Sox games especially during in September and that great pennant race that year.
                          I had no idea that the stations sent their signals to certain areas, I always thought the signal was sent out 360 degrees. Explains why I could never pick up WLS when I was in New York.
                          IIRC, WLS, WMAQ, WGN and WCFL were all 50,000 watt stations.
                          This topic of Sox radio broadcasts was a thread on the WSI site ~ 15 yrs ago.I was born and lived in the Buffalo NY area for 60+ yrs.When the sun went down WCFL came into my home loud and clear. By 10pm EST the station was equal in quality to the local Buffalo radio stations. I loved WCFL when I was a teenager, it allowed me to hear my heroes play.
                          I also believe that a member of WSI back then, who resided in Mass; claimed that on very calm clear evenings he was able to tune in WCFL.



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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by LITTLE NELL View Post

                            When I was in the Air Force in from 65-69 I picked up WLS 890 everynight while stationed in South Dakota in 65 and 66. When I was transfered to Newburgh New York in 1967 I picked up WMAQ 670 and listened to a lot of Sox games especially during in September and that great pennant race that year.
                            I had no idea that the stations sent their signals to certain areas, I always thought the signal was sent out 360 degrees. Explains why I could never pick up WLS when I was in New York.
                            IIRC, WLS, WMAQ, WGN and WCFL were all 50,000 watt stations.
                            WSCR (old WMAQ), WGN, WBBM, and WLS were designated "1-A" stations by the FCC way back in the 1930s to spray 50,000 watts in all directions from a single tower. They originally had clear channels, which meant nobody else was on their frequency at night. With big power and no interference, on most nights they easily covered at least 30 states and parts of Canada. Over the years the interference-free protection they enjoyed was chipped away as the FCC allowed other stations on those frequencies. The result is that it's not as easy to pick up WGN in Texas as it used to be.

                            WMVP (the old WCFL) is also 50,000 watts, but was a "1-B" station, meaning it could have 50,000 watts but had to share the frequency with another big 1-B station. The FCC's checkerboard pattern of license allocations was intended to minimize interference. That's why KOMO in Seattle and WMVP in Chicago are both 50,000 watts on 1000 kHz, but at night they point their signals away from each other.

                            For WCFL in the 1930s, the Downers Grove transmitter site was so far west of the the population center that coverage into Chicago and the east was no problem. In the 80 years since, the population has spread out and now we notice WMVP's signal sputtering out as we drive west of DuPage County. Nothing wrong with the station; they're just stuck with a pre-WWII transmitter position among 21st-century urban sprawl.
                            - tebman

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                            • #15
                              Tebman, do you think with the growth of the Chicago metro area, that it would make sense for WMVP to move their transmitter to, say, Sugar Grove or Sandwich? Or is it just too expensive of a proposition in terms of land and construction costs?

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