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  • Sox sponsor question...

    Folks:

    As you may know Dr. David Fletcher is coming out with a book in the Fall on Dick Allen and the 1972 White Sox. He is getting help from others including myself in the effort.

    One thing we are trying to pin down are the sponsors for White Sox TV broadcasts in the early 1970's.

    What we know right now includes:

    Interlake Steel
    The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Union
    Wheeler AMC/Jeep (located in Orland Park)

    If anyone out there can remember other sponsors, I'd appreciate it if you can list them here along with any specific information (where they were located for example if they were a private business say)

    Many thanks,
    Mark

  • #2
    Falstaff was a radio sponsor but can't remember if on TV also.

    EDIT: Thanks to 5187 posting that video, Falstaff was a TV sponsor.
    Last edited by LITTLE NELL; 06-29-2021, 04:02 PM.
    Now coming up to bat for the White Sox is the Mighty Mite, Nelson Fox.

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    • #3
      Stroh's arrived by the time Veeck came along. Don't know if they were here before Veeck.

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      • #4
        Lip, I have game programs from the Dick Allen years at home. I'll check and get back to you.

        2021 Sox Attendance Tracker: 8-4
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        • #5
          Originally posted by Chez View Post
          Lip, I have game programs from the Dick Allen years at home. I'll check and get back to you.
          Thanks I have one from 1972 and found some more, just let me know what you may be able to find.

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          • #6
            Not sure if this helps, but there's an end of a Sox game from '74 on YouTube and it includes Harry doing the postgame show where I think he mentions some of the sponsors:

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            • #7
              Originally posted by whitesox5187 View Post
              Not sure if this helps, but there's an end of a Sox game from '74 on YouTube and it includes Harry doing the postgame show where I think he mentions some of the sponsors:

              Nice Work there Sherlock Holmes. I’m sure if we all go down the internet rabbit hole we’ll uncover some Chicagoland gems.

              BK59

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              • #8
                Originally posted by whitesox5187 View Post
                Not sure if this helps, but there's an end of a Sox game from '74 on YouTube and it includes Harry doing the postgame show where I think he mentions some of the sponsors:

                They got that video from me.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by whitesox5187 View Post
                  Not sure if this helps, but there's an end of a Sox game from '74 on YouTube and it includes Harry doing the postgame show where I think he mentions some of the sponsors:

                  I miss the old school play-by-play style. Only once during the entire inning is there a mention of what pitch was thrown (just before the 10:00 mark). No information on pitch speed, type of pitch, prognostication of what pitch should be coming next and after that one. Just calling the game. Emotion, not analysis. That is what is wrong with today (all Baseball broadcasts, not any one in particular). It is full of analysis and missing just pure enjoyment of the action on the field.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Dumpjerry View Post

                    I miss the old school play-by-play style. Only once during the entire inning is there a mention of what pitch was thrown (just before the 10:00 mark). No information on pitch speed, type of pitch, prognostication of what pitch should be coming next and after that one. Just calling the game. Emotion, not analysis. That is what is wrong with today (all Baseball broadcasts, not any one in particular). It is full of analysis and missing just pure enjoyment of the action on the field.
                    I thought about this and you're absolutely correct.

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                    • #11
                      Ad from a 1972 Sox scorecard. Others I remember: Drovers Bank, Chevrolet (Wasn't there a commercial where Bill Melton sang "Switch on, there goes another Chevy" while he was taking a shower?), True Value Hardware, and Olympic (or Olympia) Federal Savings.

                      Wheeler AMC was in Olympia Fields, not Orland Park. There wasn't much in Orland Park in the early '70's.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by kba View Post
                        Ad from a 1972 Sox scorecard. Others I remember: Drovers Bank, Chevrolet (Wasn't there a commercial where Bill Melton sang "Switch on, there goes another Chevy" while he was taking a shower?), True Value Hardware, and Olympic (or Olympia) Federal Savings.

                        Wheeler AMC was in Olympia Fields, not Orland Park. There wasn't much in Orland Park in the early '70's.

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                        KBA: Thanks I found that ad myself earlier today.

                        and it was Olympic Savings and Loan they also sponsored the baseball clinics at the area banks, the Soxettes and the Meet the Sox baseball dinners.
                        Last edited by Lipman 1; 06-29-2021, 11:10 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Dumpjerry View Post

                          I miss the old school play-by-play style. Only once during the entire inning is there a mention of what pitch was thrown (just before the 10:00 mark). No information on pitch speed, type of pitch, prognostication of what pitch should be coming next and after that one. Just calling the game. Emotion, not analysis. That is what is wrong with today (all Baseball broadcasts, not any one in particular). It is full of analysis and missing just pure enjoyment of the action on the field.
                          I agree with this, although one criticism of baseball play-by-play used to be that there was too much non-baseball banter. It varied from city to city, but it's possible the increase in analysis was a reaction to criticisms of baseball announcers. A recent criticism I heard was that pitch information flashes on a screen in some places, making it difficult to see where the ball actually hit the catcher' glove.

                          As for the sponsors from the early 1970s, the "switch on, there goes another Chevy" song still runs through my mind. There was one with Sox players in the shower that I saw just a couple of times, with laughter at the end as the shot pulls out to show they are wearing sweatpants. One of the players was Wilbur Wood, so I'm guessing that add was from games somewhere around 1972.

                          In 1970, I came home from a family summer driving vacation to Colorado to see the dead-last White Sox had picked up Alka Seltzer as a sponsor, which seemed appropriate. In 1969 on Channel 32, I liked that in the late innings Jack Drees would just talk about the game instead of going to a commercial. I discovered later that they had more breaks for commercials than they could sell.

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                          • #14
                            Maybe I’m in the minority, but I like it when announcers teach me something new. I think Benetti and Stone do a good job intertwining both quantitative and qualitative analysis.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Frater Perdurabo View Post
                              Maybe I’m in the minority, but I like it when announcers teach me something new. I think Benetti and Stone do a good job intertwining both quantitative and qualitative analysis.
                              I agree, I also think if announcers back then had access to a radar gun they'd certainly be talking about how hard someone like Nolan Ryan was throwing. It's also easy to focus solely on the game when a starter is clinging to a one-run lead in the bottom of the 9th with a no-no going, it's a lot harder to do that in a blowout and there are plenty of clips of Harry Caray talking about anything but the game with Jimmy Piersall on YouTube.

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