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Happy Anniversary "Big Nick"...

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  • Happy Anniversary "Big Nick"...

    May 6, 1964 - Dave Nicholson hit what may have been the longest home run in MLB history. On this night in the fifth inning, in the first game of a twin bill versus the A’s, Nicholson blasted a shot off future Sox pitcher Moe Drabowsky that went over the roof and was found across the street in Armour Square. Some Sox fans claimed they heard the ball hit the top of the roof but White Sox officials said when they found the ball it had no signs of tar on it nor was it scuffed. Nicholson’s shot went over the roof around the 375-foot sign in left center field. It was found 135 feet from the base of the wall. Plus, you have to add in the elevation needed to get the ball over the roof, approximately 70 feet.

    Hitting a ball on to the roof or over it required a ground-to-ground distance of at least 474 feet. Unofficial estimates place the drive as traveling 573 feet eclipsing Mickey Mantle’s shot at Griffith Stadium in Washington in 1956. That shot went an unofficial 565 feet.

    For the night Dave would hammer three home runs and drive in five RBI’s in the twin bill as the Sox swept both games, 6-4 and 11-4.


    Ron Hansen told me a story about Dave and how strong he was, after a frustrating game for him he took a shower and when he was done he twisted the hot/cold faucets so tight nobody else could get them loose to use that shower!

  • #2
    I remember that night, I was 18 and working in the back room of the produce department at the Kroger store on the 6600 block of Ridge avenue bagging oranges and had the Sox game on a radio that was on the produce managers desk. When I heard the call IIRC by Milo Hamilton I couldn't believe that someone could hit a ball that far at old Comiskey. This was before they moved home plate 8 feet towards CF in 1982 when it was only 341 feet down the foul lines and not the 352 feet and 375 to the power alleys which was more like 385 according to many ballplayers.

    I remember this photo and almost positive it was on the front page of the May 7th, 1964 Sun-Times.
    What I also remember was that the ball was to the left of the 375 marker, somewhere between the foul line and the 375 marker, as you can see in the photo, the 375 marker is nowhere to be seen.
    Click image for larger version  Name:	comiskey.jpg Views:	0 Size:	291.3 KB ID:	29346
    Last edited by LITTLE NELL; 05-06-2021, 04:50 PM.
    Now coming up to bat for the White Sox is the Mighty Mite, Nelson Fox.

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    • #3
      Nicholson was a two-outcome hitter. HR or K.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Dick Allen View Post
        Nicholson was a two-outcome hitter. HR or K.
        Yes he was and he didn't last long in the Majors. His best year was in 1963 when he came over to the Sox as part of the Luis Aparicio trade with the Orioles when he and Pete Ward led the team with 22 homers. He had 70 RBI but led the A.L.with 175 Ks. Sox traded him to Houston in 1966, wound up in Atlanta in 67 and retired after the season.
        Last edited by LITTLE NELL; 05-06-2021, 03:46 PM.
        Now coming up to bat for the White Sox is the Mighty Mite, Nelson Fox.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by LITTLE NELL View Post
          I remember that night, I was 18 and working in the back room of the produce department at the Kroger store on the 6600 block of Ridge avenue bagging oranges and had the Sox game on a radio that was on the produce managers desk. When I heard the call IIRC by Milo Hamilton I couldn't believe that someone could hit a ball that far at old Comiskey. This was before they moved home plate 8 feet towards CF in 1982 when it was only 341 feet down the foul lines and not the 352 feet and 375 to the power alleys which was more like 385 according to many ballplayers.

          I remember this photo and almost positive it was on the front page of the May 7th, 1964 Sun-Times.
          What I also remember was that the ball was to the left of the 375 marker, somewhere between the foul line and the 375 marker, as you can see in the photo, the 375 marker is nowhere to be seen.
          Click image for larger version Name:	comiskey.jpg Views:	0 Size:	291.3 KB ID:	29346
          I have that photo myself

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Lipman 1 View Post

            I have that photo myself
            One thing I did forget is they gave Aparicio's number to Big Nick.
            Last edited by LITTLE NELL; 05-06-2021, 07:35 PM.
            Now coming up to bat for the White Sox is the Mighty Mite, Nelson Fox.

            Comment


            • #7
              I alway wondered what happened to Nickolson. Those were the first couple of years I really understood the game and could recall the line ups playing pick up games on the sandlot. With Ward , Robinson and Big Nick I felt the Sox could finally match the Yankees with the long ball. The only thing missing was a short porch in both right and left field.

              BK59

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              • #8
                Originally posted by BigKlu59 View Post
                I alway wondered what happened to Nickolson. Those were the first couple of years I really understood the game and could recall the line ups playing pick up games on the sandlot. With Ward , Robinson and Big Nick I felt the Sox could finally match the Yankees with the long ball. The only thing missing was a short porch in both right and left field.

                BK59
                From what his teammates told me it was basically a case of a guy with immense talent who simply tried to hard and put to much pressure on himself basically every at-bat, every game. It happens.

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                • #9
                  I was 12 back then, but I seem to remember an older fan talking about his 'peek a boo' batting stance. Does anybody remember that? I just remember a guy talking about it, not first hand. My family members were mostly fans of the "other team" in town, so I only got to Sox games when my uncle took me.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by WSox597 View Post
                    I was 12 back then, but I seem to remember an older fan talking about his 'peek a boo' batting stance. Does anybody remember that? I just remember a guy talking about it, not first hand. My family members were mostly fans of the "other team" in town, so I only got to Sox games when my uncle took me.
                    I've never heard that term "peek a boo" batting stance, could it have been like not keeping your head down and taking your eyes off the ball in the golf swing?
                    Now coming up to bat for the White Sox is the Mighty Mite, Nelson Fox.

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                    • #11
                      Yeah, could be. I was just a pup, but for some reason it stuck in my head. The way it was described was his arm was up so high, he had to sort of look under his arm. Hard to picture, really.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by LITTLE NELL View Post

                        I've never heard that term "peek a boo" batting stance, could it have been like not keeping your head down and taking your eyes off the ball in the golf swing?
                        Stan Musial's batting stance was a peek a boo stance. I'm sure you can find a photo of it on the internet.

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                        • #13
                          I remember Musial's stance quite well, slight crouch with the bat held upright but still don't know why it was called a peek a boo. IIRC Big Nick's stance did not look any thing like Musial's. Ted Williams stance was close to Musials except for the crouch.

                          OK, I found why its called a peek a boo, Stan's head was almost tucked behind his right shoulder which looked like he was playing peek a boo with the pitcher, sure worked for him as his lifetime BA was .337.


                          Last edited by LITTLE NELL; 05-08-2021, 05:59 PM.
                          Now coming up to bat for the White Sox is the Mighty Mite, Nelson Fox.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Nicholson and Musial batting stances.

                            Click image for larger version  Name:	image_460.jpg Views:	4 Size:	20.1 KB ID:	29508 Click image for larger version  Name:	image_461.jpg Views:	4 Size:	9.9 KB ID:	29509
                            Last edited by LITTLE NELL; 05-07-2021, 07:56 PM.
                            Now coming up to bat for the White Sox is the Mighty Mite, Nelson Fox.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Nell you are a wealth of baseball knowledge.

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