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R.I.P. Claudell Washington

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  • R.I.P. Claudell Washington

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/sports/mlb...0Aj?li=BBnbfcL

  • #2
    that sucks...
    Riding Shotgun on the Sox Bandwagon since before there was an Internet...



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    • #3
      Sorry he's gone at such a young age but being honest he was my least favorite Sox player ever.
      Batting in the second position for the White Sox, number 2, the second baseman Nelson Fox.

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      • #4
        I seem to remember him coming up at a very young age with Finley's A's. As the story went, he was playing sandlot ball and working as a school janitor when he was "discovered". Less than a year later he was up in the big leagues and it looked like he was going to blossom into a real star.

        He played here from 1978-1980 and he did hit three homers in one game. But IIRC he would take a game off here or there, even when he would be in the lineup. My favorite memory would be a large sign in the right field bleachers of old Comiskey. Unfurled by the fans it read "Washington Slept Here".

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        • #5
          Originally posted by fungo bat View Post
          I seem to remember him coming up at a very young age with Finley's A's. As the story went, he was playing sandlot ball and working as a school janitor when he was "discovered". Less than a year later he was up in the big leagues and it looked like he was going to blossom into a real star.

          He played here from 1978-1980 and he did hit three homers in one game. But IIRC he would take a game off here or there, even when he would be in the lineup. My favorite memory would be a large sign in the right field bleachers of old Comiskey. Unfurled by the fans it read "Washington Slept Here".
          I was wondering when the sign would come up and have to say that the bar has to be very high (or low, depending on your perspective, let's settle on "extreme") for a White Sox player to rank as a White Sox fan's least favorite White Sox player.

          Washington looked like he was going to be a real star when he came up with the A's, but Dayan Viciedo looked like he was going to do some damage when he came up with the Sox. I remember telling my father, who at the time lived in Dallas, that the White Sox had traded Bobby Bonds to Texas. He wasn't impressed when I said it was for Washington, although to be fair Rusty Torres came over to the Sox as well. I expected more out of Washington, and he was looking like he would be a threat in the lineup through the middle of May 1979, from my perspective in Arizona where I was only able to go by newspaper accounts. It's difficult to understand how Veeck gave up so much to get Bonds after the 1977 season ended up turning him over Washington (and Torres) just six weeks into the 1978 season.

          Washington went to high school in Berkeley, nearby Oakland, but apparently he wore out his welcome with the A's. He bounced around a lot and had a long career for a player who wasn't drafted out of high school (although sometimes that happens to players who end up getting some major league playing time -- Ron Kittle wasn't drafted out of Gary Wirt).

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          • #6
            Remember him being a decent contributing player, never the standout, on every team he was ever on.

            I was living in Atlanta when he was with the Braves. Pretty much the type of player he was with the Sox. But his usefulness was enhanced by the long-term presence of guys like Bob Horner and Dale Murphy in the lineup, which probably explains why he lasted as long as he did there.

            Rest in peace. Sixty-five seems way too young in our era.

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            • #7
              RIP, Mr. Washington.
              (Formerly asindc.)

              "I have the ultimate respect for White Sox fans. They were as miserable as the Cubs and Red Sox fans ever were but always had the good decency to keep it to themselves. And when they finally won the World Series, they celebrated without annoying every other fan in the country." Jim Caple, ESPN (January 12, 2011)

              "We have now sunk to a depth at which the restatement of the (bleeding) obvious is the first duty of intelligent men." — George Orwell

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